Tag: WeChat


14

Nov 2017

Bite-sized WeChat Material for Advanced Learners: Luoji Siwei

I want to share a WeChat account I’ve found interesting called 罗辑思维 (a little play on what sounds like “Logical Thinking,” since the host’s surname is Luo). It’s not a podcast about formal logic; the topic is all kinds of useful ideas and thoughts on modern society, with a healthy sprinkling of issues related to entrepreneurship. It’s well-suited to advanced learners, and it has the following key advantages:

Luoji Siwei - Luo Pang

  1. Every audio post is only 60 seconds long (called 罗胖60秒). No “listening marathons” here.
  2. Every audio post has a nicely organized transcript (numbered points!) just below it.
  3. Yes, there is some salesy content, but the main topics are still interesting and the sales messages are short and easy to ignore.
  4. 罗胖‘s voice is clear and he is easy to listen to.
  5. His material is a good example of Chinese content marketing, if you’re into that sort of thing.

It’s so hard to find material this is both interesting (to non-Chinese) and short, and this is one of the best resources I’ve found. (Please let me know what you think of it in the comments!)

I personally find all 8 of his most recent topics quite interesting, so here they are (no filtering needed):

  1. 缺陷与机会
  2. 文明的使命
  3. 怎样给书起名,才能卖得好
  4. 我们会被00后抛弃吗?
  5. 如何快速学懂一个陌生领域
  6. 合同的本质
  7. 圆珠笔芯为什么都那么细
  8. 谁是你的竞争对手?

Here are a few screenshots of those:

Luoji Siwei Screencap 05

Luoji Siwei Screencap 04

Luoji Siwei Screencap 03

Luoji Siwei Screencap 02

Luoji Siwei Screencap 01

To find the WeChat account, just search for “罗辑思维” on WeChat. [Note: you’ll still find it if you search for “逻辑思维.”] There are also videos on YouTube and Youku.

罗胖‘s real name is 罗振宇. You can read more about him on his Baidu Baike page.

What good material have you found on WeChat?


What I wish my Chinese teacher knew

14

Jul 2016

What I wish my Chinese teacher knew

One of the things we do at AllSet Learning in Shanghai is to continually train our teachers. Of course it’s not that our teachers have no training; in fact, many of them have masters degrees and many years of teaching experience. The issue is that many of the academic degrees and classroom teaching experience attained in China draw on an outdated teaching tradition, largely a variation of how the Chinese educational system teaches Chinese children.

1-on-1_MYC

Add to that the fact that our service is based on deep personalization for individual learners, each with her own goals, needs, interests, and quirks, and you pretty much have an endless bounty of teaching issues to discuss and improve upon.

As a result, we’ve been sharing some of our ideals, methods, and tips with our teachers in Chinese on WeChat. Then we also post a lot of the same material to our own blog. Some articles come from old Sinosplice posts (like this one), sharing the foreign learner perspective with Chinese teachers (like this one), while others share more specific teaching tips. (We have a number of articles of this type which haven’t yet been ported from WeChat.)

The point of this post is to ask the question: What do you wish your Chinese teacher knew? I’d be happy to make it into a topic that we address in Chinese in a constructive way, and share online.

Obviously, we’re not talking about politics or cultural differences. It’s issues like:

  1. I know my tones suck; why won’t you correct me more?
  2. I really don’t think I need to be able to hand-write 2000 characters…
  3. If you’re my Chinese teacher, why do you ask me to call you “Sunny” instead of something Chinese?
  4. This textbook doesn’t even have the word for “cell phone” in it… why can’t we update?

Please share your ideas in the comments, or on Facebook, or whatever. All constructive feedback welcome! This is about working to improve the situation, not simply whining.