The Grammar of an Ode to Stinky Tofu

31 Jul 2017

I never imagined that collaborating with a musician to create a fun song for learning Chinese grammar would result in a love song to stinky tofu (臭豆腐), of all foods! But that is indeed what happened last week. Check out the result, from Chinese Buddy:

It’s a fun song, and there are two kids in my house (and even an adult or two) that can’t stop humming it. From a grammatical perspective, the use of the verb with various objects is highlighted.

My input into the Chinese learning part of the song was:

  • Include , 不要, and 要不要 as well as a variety of objects
  • Try not to let the melody of the song “warp” the tones of the important words too much (especially “yào”)
  • Keep the tones as clear as possible, including the tone change for 不要 (bù yào → bú yào)
  • Include some “spoken” audio in the song

Yep, four checks! If you’re a beginner working on basic sentence patterns, I hope you find this song helpful. As for the stinky tofu… well, I’ll leave that up to your own judgment.

Do also check out Chinese Buddy on YouTube. There are a bunch of songs (mostly oriented at children), and the styles of the songs range quite a bit, so don’t judge the music on just one or two songs. Probably my second favorite song would the the Tones Song. (Yeah, I have a thing for tones, and also ukulele music, maybe?)

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John Pasden

John is a Shanghai-based linguist and entrepreneur, founder of AllSet Learning.

Comments

  1. Brilliant! My day has been made!

  2. Hua Dong Says: August 3, 2017 at 1:38 pm

    That’s great! I’ll use the song in my class in the fall!

  3. […] I’ve teamed up with Chinese Buddy on a new song, and this time the grammar point is a very basic one related to saying “have” (有) and “don’t have” (没有). Besides Chinese language, it seems that our collaborations revolve around anti-materialism and food (last time was stinky tofu). […]

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